15 Sep 2021

Five of the best beaches on the Eyre Peninsula

There is more than 2000 kilometres of pristine and mostly deserted coastline just waiting to be discovered along the Eyre Peninsula. From beach alcoves named after European scenery to sandbars that look imported from the Caribbean - spend long enough flitting between these remote beach escapes and you will forget you are even in Australia. But with so much beauty to behold, where does one start? Well, we have taken the leg work out of it by collating the ultimate checklist for any traveller dreaming of aquamarine waters, untouched sand and the sound of quiet.

1. PERLUBIE BEACH

Perlubie Beach, Eyre Peninsula
Perlubie Beach, Eyre Peninsula

Think long stretches of sand, endless places to make camp before waking up to every shade of blue. Perlubie tops the list for its absolute beachfront camping, the ability to beach launch the boat and the breathtaking view of the sun, sky and sea melting together at sunset. The calm waters of Perlubie, located on the western end of the Eyre Peninsula coastline near Streaky Bay, make it a family friendly beach stop. Seafood lovers can pull out the gas bottle and mini bbq to grill up some freshly caught crab or snapper for a true paddock to plate experience. If beachfront camping isn’t your style, you can rinse off the salt and sand in one of the deep tubs on offer at the ecologically built Perlubie Sea villas. 

2. Almonta Beach

Almonta Beach, Eyre Peninsula
Almonta Beach, Eyre Peninsula

This stretch of coastline offers the quintessential Australian experience. While the entire peninsula boasts impossibly blue waters, this beach – located inside the Coffin Bay National Park – is home to an array of native wildlife, including kangaroos, emus and goannas. Take it slow along the 2WD access road as you discover the breathtaking views from the lookout area, before making a splash in the crystal clear shallows. If you are lucky, you might even spot a pod of dolphins nearby. Come low tide when a lagoon forms and rock pools surface, pull out your snorkel and explore the world beneath the water. If your picture of paradise comes paired with seafood fresh from the ocean, you’ll find nirvana in this neck of the woods. Slip into waders and out into the waters of a working oyster farm where you’ll be served freshly plucked Pacific Oysters with Coffin Bay Oyster Farm and Tasting Tours – all this just 30 minutes from Port Lincoln. 2WD vehicles can gain access from the Golden Island Lookout before settling in at the nearby Yangie Bay campground, or for a more luxurious nights sleep Almonta Apartments offer upscale accommodation in Coffin Bay. 

3. GREENLY BEACH

Greenly Beach, Eyre Peninsula
Greenly Beach, Eyre Peninsula

While this area is increasingly becoming known for its Insta-worthy and well hidden rock pools, the sandy beach nearby is well worth the visit and is a few degrees warmer than the notoriously icy pools. Just an hours drive away from the Eyre Peninsula’s hub Port Lincoln, you can wet your toes - and your appetite -  with a freshly shucked oyster in hand or climb nearby Mount Greenly to catch the sun setting over a panoramic view of the Great Australian Bight. Greenly Beach offers free campsites for visitors and is dog friendly, for those intrepid four legged friends. Looking for pet friendly camping options on the Eyre Peninsula? Check out our guide.

4. MEMORY COVE

Memory Cove, Eyre Peninsula
Memory Cove, Eyre Peninsula

Like its name suggests, Memory Cove will be etched in your memory bank forever! It’s tough to pick just one of the many gems dotted along the coastline of the Lincoln National Park, but the ability to wake up and fall asleep to the soothing sounds of the ocean lapping at your shady beachfront campsite makes Memory Cove the ultimate pick. If you have a 4WD vehicle you can drive onto the beach and cool off immediately in the shallows, where we are told kangaroos occasionally like to frolic. Be sure to stop in at the information centre and book your campsite in advance to avoid disappointment. If you have the time, you can explore the nearby Cape Catastrophe – named by Matthew Flinders in honour of eight crew members who died when their boat capsized offshore in 1802.

5. LOCKS WELL

Locks Well, Eyre Peninsula
Locks Well, Eyre Peninsula

Locks Well is framed by dramatic cliff edges, flora and fauna – earning it a coveted spot in our top five. This protected alcove of sand – tucked in a dip between two muscular cliffs – is popular with fisherman looking for a salmon catch. Travellers looking to catch some rays instead can embark on the Locks Well walk, descending a 283 step wooden staircase to the secluded beach below. The lower car park offers spectacular panoramic views and a lookout, where you could waste away hours watching the mesmerising push and pull of the ocean.

Doing a broader road trip of South Australia? check out our guides for the best beaches in Kangaroo Island, the Yorke Peninsula and Adelaide

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